7 articles on psychology, aid stations, running tricks, dreaming on your feet and walk breaks

Last updated: 19-Jul-18

By Elsa Trujillo

This week it’s mostly about our heads, minds and hearts when running. The psychology you need to master to train and complete races, the power of human and calorie aid in the midst of an ultra, and tips on making running easier both physically and mentally. We also have an article on walk breaks, an interview with Andy Murray and some research on the wanderings of the mind. Finally, RunUltra’s own article by our running psychologist Sarah Cooke expands on psychological improvements you can apply to your training plan. Read on!

Can you? Yes, you can
If you’re a newbie to ultra running and still wondering whether you should sign up to your first 50k, no, you don’t have to be an elite athlete. Read this article to find out how to approach your new adventure.

The power of aid
Aid stations are not just stepping stones towards the finish line, and a decision to pass them quickly could mean the difference between success or a DNF. But aid does not come only in food or drink format, read the article.

Make running easier
Running is hard. Training is hard. So, make it easier on yourself and try these 16 ways to improve your running. Read them here.

The (running) doctor
The Guardian newspaper caught up with our favourite Scottish running doctor, Andy Murray, to find out what he’s been up to.

You can also read this RunUltra article on Andy’s 2015 Namibian adventure.

Thinking on the run
What do you think about when you wash the dishes? And when you run for 100 kilometres? This article delves into ultra running mind-sets and mental landscapes, and how the wandering of your mind transitions from positive to darker thoughts just as you body turns from euphoric to exhausted.

To break or not to break your run with a walk
This article examines the walk break as a valuable recovery period and how to transition away from them once you have reached a certain level of fitness. Read it here.

A psychological approach to running
If you struggle to follow training plans, Sarah Cook explains the five steps you can take to improve your efforts. Read them here.

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