7 articles on suffering, strength training, injury blues, funny socks and Pokemon

Last updated: 14-Mar-19

By Elsa Trujillo

At RunUltra we know that the months of July to September are jam-packed with races (check out our calendar if you don’t believe us) However, many are in the middle of a hot/warm summer which means juggling dream vacations (or bored children on holiday) with training and getting ready for the next race. We want you to stay calm, safe, recuperate faster and train better. To that end, we have hunted down the best articles on ultra running so that you don’t have to. And, of course, there’s Pokemon.

Is your first ultra coming up fast?
If the date of your first foray into the world of ultra running is speeding towards you, you’re probably starting to feel those nerves flaring. We’ve found this article to better explain how you are (and will be) feeling and how to cope with it. Of course, if you’re an expert ultra runner it will be fun to read through it and check if any of these 15 stages of suffering ever get any easier. Read them here.

Supplemental training
Take it from an experienced runner, you should consider strength training, a sure way to prevent injuries, increase speed and improved muscular endurance. Read the article by coach Alan Culpepper explaining how best to integrate this type of training into your regular routine.

Dealing with injuries
Dealing with running injuries that stop you from practising your favourite sport is painful and stressful enough article no longer available to get a clearer idea of what you can do to improve your mood and your chances of a faster recovery.

Compression gear, yes or no, during or after?
If you’re not a compressor and are not sure what this means, we bring your attention to all those runners you see wearing tall, tight (and often bright) socks to just below the knee, in true school-uniform fashion. They do tights, too. If you wonder if you should or shouldn’t get a pair, read this article on the scientific evidence supporting their benefits in reducing muscle damage and inflammation. This article is no longer available.

Yes, you can run with your Pokemon Go
You’ve read about it, seen it on television or with your own eyes in your local park. People chasing virtual creatures and capturing them with their phones all over Europe, North America and Japan. Maybe you’ve actually downloaded the app. Whatever your opinion on this latest online gaming craze, one of its pluses is that it makes you get on your feet and move. Read this article to find out how running can improve your chances of capturing an Ultrasorus or whatever their insanely cute names are.

Staying safe on the trails
Ultra trail running should be a pleasure (mixed with the obvious pain) but should never be fatal, and yet on occasion death crosses the path of runners in ultra running events all around the globe. Heat, cold or underlying diseases can strike at any time and runners, and organisers, should always be prepared and aware of danger to themselves and others. In this article, Yitka Winn reflects on the tragedy that befell a Mexican runner in the 2016 Ultra Fiord in Chile and how all can learn from what happened. This article is no longer available.

Are you a running mum?
If you’re a mum and thinking about signing up to your first ultra or an ultra runner soon to be a mum, read this article by Rachel Gorajala on how to combine motherhood and your ultra running passion.
 

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An ultra distance race including at least two of the following activities such as running, swimming, cycling, kayaking, skiing and climbing. It may also include different climatic conditions (eg ice, snow, humidity, cold water, mud or heat).

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Increase of up to 2000 metres with very challenging climatic conditions (e.g. ice, snow, humidity, heat or at high altitude)

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Very experienced long distance ultra runners (min 3 years’ experience) or are doing regular long distance running (>50 miles) with elevation and conditions shown (where possible). Admission to these races is often subject to receipt of a recent medical examination certificate. Purchase of specialist kit is often recommended for these races.

Expert

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Increase of up to 2000 metres with some challenging climatic conditions (e.g. ice, snow, humidity or heat)

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Experienced runners who have completed at least 4 ultras in last 12 months, or are doing regular long distance running (>50 miles) with elevation and conditions shown (where possible). Admission to these races may be subject to receipt of a recent medical examination certificate. Check with the race organiser regarding entry requirements.

Advanced

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Increase of up to 1500 metres

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Runners who have completed several ultra distances or similar events, or are doing long distance running regularly, with elevation shown.

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Runners who have completed at least one ultra in last 6 months or are doing long distance running (>26 miles) regularly, with elevation shown.

Beginner

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Very little change < 500 metres

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First ultra event. Runners completing a marathon or doing regular long distance running (>26 miles) in the last 6 months.