7 of the Best

Last updated: 07-Mar-19

By Kate Allen

This month some interesting articles have landed in my inbox but I do like swimming around on Twitter picking up the gossip and February had plenty of it. 

Two big races in the ultra running calendar; the Rocky Raccoon in the US and Arc of Attrition in the South West were run and Centurion’s teaser of three mysterious new races set Twitter alight.

So, without further ado, I turn my eye to Centurion’s exciting recent announcement of 3 new races; Wendover Woods 100, Track 100, and Piece of String.  Obviously I’ll be writing my winning race report for the Track later in September, but in the meantime for those of you wondering what on earth Piece of String is all about, here is the blog from the fiendish mind behind it all after he directed the first event.

James Adam’s blog

For those of you planning a multi day event, I found this blog on the meticulous planning of food and hydration fascinating; such a far cry from stumbling between picnic tables, er… I mean checkpoints, every few miles.

Mark Whittle’s blog

Following straight on from such exacting standards, I found something more suited to those of us taking our hydration a little more casually.  I apologise to my craft beer-loving friends for the American brands used but feel free to supply your own suggestions.

Racing beer

A couple of mates ran the infamous Arc of Attrition, which claimed its usual share of scalps.  Having heard their accounts I have hastily removed it from my to-do-list but reading this blog from the winning lady is very inspiring (but not that inspiring!).

Laura’s blog

Whenever I despair at fitting in training around what I believe to be a busy lifestyle, I read something like this interview and it makes me pull up my socks and mutter to myself that I have it easy really.

Liza Howard article

Back to the big races and my friend Sarah Sawyer went out to the States for the Rocky Raccoon.  Here is her beautifully honest and frank account of the race and her first ever DNF; Reading about these experiences is just as inspirational as the ones that go well.

Sarah’s blog

And finally, as I creep up the ageing ladder I love finding stories like this.  No matter what, if your outlook is positive, you really can do anything you put your mind to.

King of the Trails article

"Without needing to use words like "hardest", "toughest", "longest", "wettest", "highest", "hottest" or anythingelseisest we wanted to put something on that would still be something to some of ultra running's most resilient characters. Credit: James Adams"

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